Playwright Katori Hall visits Emory with Two Free Events

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October 17, 2012

ATLANTA¿Olivier Award-winning playwright Katori Hall delivers the 2012 Phillis Wheatley Reading at Emory University as part of the Creative Writing Reading Series. Hall will give a free public reading on Wedneday, Nov. 14 at 6:30 PM in the Jones Room of the Woodruff Library.

Also during her visit to Emory, Hall will participate in a colloquium with students at 2 p.m. on the 14th in the Calloway Center, Room N301 on Emory¿s camps. Hall will answer questions and discuss her career as a playwright.

Katori Hall is a playwright and performer from Memphis, Tennessee, whose play "The Mountaintop" won the 2010 Olivier Award for Best New Play and, opened on Broadway in 2011. Her other plays include ¿Hurt Village¿ (2011 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize), ¿Children of Killers,¿ ¿Hoodoo Love,¿ ¿Remembrance,¿ ¿Saturday Night/Sunday Morning,¿ ¿WHADDABLOODCLOT!!!,¿ ¿The Hope Well,¿ ¿Our Lady of Kibeho¿ and ¿Pussy Valley.¿

Her awards include the ARENA Stage American Voices New Play Residency, the Kate Neal Kinley Fellowship, two Lecomte du Nouy Prizes from Lincoln Center, the Fellowship of Southern Writers Bryan Family Award in Drama, the Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award and the Otis Guernsey New Voices Playwriting Award. Hall¿s journalism has appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, UK¿s The Guardian, Essence, Newsweek and The Commercial Appeal.

Hall is an alumna of the Lark Playwrights¿ Workshop, where she developed "The Mountaintop," and a graduate of Columbia University, the A.R.T. at Harvard University, and the Juilliard School.

The Phillis Wheatley Reading is a part of the Emory University Creative Writing Program Reading Series, bringing international writers to the Emory and Atlanta community. All events are free and open to the public. For additional information, visit arts.emory.edu.

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Creative Writing Program
The undergraduate Creative Writing Program at Emory celebrates its 22nd anniversary this year. Students approach the study of literature through their own creative writing, as well as by the more traditional method of critical analysis and reading. USA Today recently named Emory the number one school for "budding writers."